A YOUNG FARMERS WORLD


Interview with Dave Odland

Posted in Uncategorized by aawalt88 on April 1, 2011

Interview with Kent Kirstein

Posted in Uncategorized by aawalt88 on April 1, 2011

Q & A with Kole Disney

Posted in Uncategorized by aawalt88 on March 23, 2011

Q. As a young farmer what are you doing to get started?

Kole Disney

A. As of right now I am attending Iowa State University and majoring in Agricultural Studies and plan to double major in Agronomy. With this I hope to gain a better knowledge of Agriculture in general to help learn the aspects it takes to run a successful farm. Along with this, I spend my summers working on the farm and it seems that I learn something new every day on the job. It helps to further my knowledge of farming as an occupation.

Q. As a young farmer are you able to afford a farm, equipment, house, sheds, storage bins?

A.  I am not able to afford all of these things just getting out of school, and to be honest I would be lucky to afford one of these things just getting out of school. This is where I am hoping to receive family help and I am sure I will. Everybody needs help starting out and I realize this from hearing my grandpa’s story on how he started with nothing and has worked his way up to what he has today.

Q. What impact do family members have on the farm business?

A.  For me family member make a huge impact in teaching me how the farm business works along with the tasks you perform year in and year out. Up to this point, all of my knowledge of farming and even agriculture in general has come from working with my grandpa, dad, and uncle. Along with this, I will call back home and ask about something I am learning in class here at Iowa State to compare how we do things. I am hoping to receive help from my family when I am done with school and staring a farm because farming is an expensive occupation. With this being said, farming is not something that you can just start out in unless you have family already doing it or have a ton of money.

Q. As a young farmer do you feel college will help you?

A. I feel that school will help a lot when I go back to farm. Right now, I already see the reasons why different chemicals and fertilizers are used and how it effects the yields along with the different types of tillage used in farming and this only after one semester of agronomy. With this being said, I am hoping that I will further learn more and be able to take something back to the table that will help make our farm run more successfully with higher yields and better efficiency to maximize profits.

Q. Where do you see the future of farming in general?

A.   Looking down the road I feel that there will be less farmers and larger amounts of land that a farmer will farm. I see farming becoming more technical and more precise to increase efficiency along with higher yields to feed the growing population.

Estimated Costs of Crop Production in Iowa for 2011

Posted in Uncategorized by aawalt88 on March 23, 2011

        Iowa State University conducted the 2011 average cost of production for corn following soy bean, herbicide tolerant soy bean following corn, and corn following corn. These were published in the Iowa Farm Bureau Spokesman. They also did other production cost and Dr. Mike D. Duffy, extension economist, lead these estimations. He shows the cost of pre-harvest machinery, seed, chemical, ect., harvest machinery, labor, land, total fixed, variable and all cost, gross returns, and net returns. Here you can see what Duffy did and see how it is different from what I did.  For example, the estimated cost of corn seed for me was $83.52 and Duffy estimated $97.50. To see the Estimated cost of crop production in Iowa go to: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/AGDm/crops/html/a1-20.html.

Estimated Crop Expenses/Income

Posted in Uncategorized by aawalt88 on March 23, 2011

Here is a look at my estimated crop expenses and income for this year.

Expense Totals

Crop insurance

 Corn $10.48 per acre

 Beans $8.40 per acre

Hail insurance

Corn $1.40 per acre

Bean $3.40 per acre

Cost of seed

Corn $83.52 per acre

Soybeans $50.00 per acre

Anhydrous

Corn $59.26 per acre

Application $8.00 per acre hiring someone to apply it for you

Chicken Litter

Corn $109.68 plus application per acre

Chemicals

Corn $20.68 per acre

Application $9.00 per acre hiring someone to apply it for you

Soy bean $25.38 per acre

Application $9.00 per acre hiring someone to apply it for you

Fuel

Estimated $25.00 per acre for both corn and soybean

Income/Expense Totals

Corn income 190 bushels  x  $6.00 = $1140.00 per acre

Soybean income 50 bushels  x $12.00 = $600.00 per acre

Government payments

Corn $20.58 per acre

Soy bean $20.58 per acre

Corn total Expense $327.02 per acre

$1160.58 total corn income per acre

$1160.58 – $327.02 = net corn income $833.56 per acre

Soy bean expense $112.18 per acre

Income $620.58 total soybean income per acre

$112.18 – $620.58 = net bean income $508.40 per acre

The North Central Cooperative

Posted in Uncategorized by aawalt88 on March 10, 2011

I am from North Central Iowa and I use the North Central Cooperative to buy my input and sell grain. I buy chemicals, fertilizer, and fuel from them. I could also buy seed but I did not use them this year.

The North Central Cooperative web site can provide you with accentual information. Especially if you’re from the North Central area of Iowa. It tells you about the market, grain updates, agronomy updates, test plot result, fuel prices, location conditions, local radar and national radar, DTN grain news, DTN live stock news, DTN/PF renewable fuels, and community news. The site provides you with technology services. You are able to get free services on your computer and cell phone. You are able to create and manage your own grain contract offers online, get Rachel’s renditions a periodical agronomy newsletter, get grain futures and cash bid text messages, e-statements and e-invoices, and online business and grain account access. The site also allows you set up an account and make online offers.

As a farmer you need to work with a COOP. This is where you can buy and sell useful need. They also can provide you with useful information that you may not be aware of.

2010 Iowa Farmland Value Survey

Posted in Uncategorized by aawalt88 on March 10, 2011

The term “acre” is used in everyday farming language as much as the word “classes” is used by college students. Understanding the size of an acre can be challenging for people who are not familiar with the term. To give you an idea of how big an acre really is, here is a list of comparisons to other everyday objects:

Half (1/2) New York City block = 1 Acre
Three (3) high school gymnasiums = 1 Acre
Four (4) Olympic swimming pools = 1 Acre
One Thousand (1000) king-size beds = 1 Acre

 

These were found at http://store.saveyourworld.com/The-Power-of-1-Acre-s/1513.htm.

As of 2010, the Iowa farmland value for an acre is $5,064, which was a 15.9 percent, or $693 increase from 2009. The 2010 Iowa Land Value Survey shows the average value per acre of Iowa farmland broken down by crop reporting district, county, quality of land, buyers and influencing factors, and recent changes in Iowa farmland values. The following chart shows the highest and lowest land values broken down by categories:

  Highest Lowest
Reporting District Northwest Iowa South Central Iowa
County O’Brien Decatur
Quality of Land High grade = $6,109 Low grade = $3,357
Buyers and Influencing Factors Existing farmers West Central

Cash Rental Rates for Iowa

Posted in Uncategorized by aawalt88 on March 10, 2011

        A 2010 survey done by farmers, landowners, lenders, real estate brokers, and professional farm managers shows the cash rental rates for Iowa. The participants in the survey made the judgment based on high, medium, and low quality cropland in their counties. This also includes land that is used for hay, oats, and pasture.

        The state of Iowa is broken down into 9 districts. In each district you can see the county average respond, typical cash rent for corn and soybean, dollar per tillable acre, typical corn yield, bushel per acre, average rent per 5 year average yield or CSR(average corn suitability rating), and typical rent for oats, hay, and pasture, dollar per acre. Go to http://www.extension.iastate.edu/publications/fm1851.pdfto see the overall average of typical cash rent, 2006-2010, corn and soybean acres and each districts cash rent survey for crop reporting. Also see the conditions that can higher or lower rent cost.

Equipment Cost

Posted in Uncategorized by aawalt88 on March 4, 2011

        The cost of equipment can be a problem for young farmers who are starting out. I went on the John Deere web site and compared the prices of 2011 equipment to used 2011 or 2010 equipment. I choose John Deere because this is the equipment my family used. The prices below reflect the types of farming equipment that are suitable to handle farming conditions in Iowa.

Tractor-

NEW- 8260R series to 9630 series can cost between $195,924  to $384,119.

USED- 8260R series to 9630 series can cost between $167,000 to $335,863 

Planter-

NEW- 1700 series to 1790 series can cost between $18,792 to $202,900.  

USED- 1700 series to 1790 series can cost between $10,000 to $100,871

Field Cultivator-

NEW- Level Lift 3-Section Draw Flexible Field Cultivator to a Floating Hitch 3 or 5-Section Draw Flexible Field Cultivator can cost between $25,818 to $74,403.

USED- Level Lift 3-Section Draw Flexible Field Cultivator to a Floating Hitch 3 or 5-Section Draw Flexible Field Cultivator can cost between $29,000 to $69,500

Disk Ripper-

NEW- 512 Rigid or Folding Disk Ripper can cost between $32,645 to $68,533.

USED- 512 Rigid or Folding Disk Ripper can cost between $23,000 to $56,000

Combine-

NEW- 9570STS series to a 9870STS series can cost between $258,985 to $388,740.

USED- 9570STS series to a 9870STS series can cost between $200,000 to $334,900

Header-

NEW- Flex Cutting Platform 600F series cost $30,692 to $44,479 and a Corn Header 600C series cost $48,266 to $124,173.

USED- Flex Cutting Platform 600F series cost $27,000 to $38,000 and a Corn Header 600C series cost $37,500 to $95,500

        These prices only reflect the estimates for standard pieces of equipment. Most farmers prefer to upgrade accessories to include GPS and automatic steering. In addition to accessories, farmers can also add the type of hitch, the storage amount, and the amount of shanks which can add to the total price. The prices listed above can be found at:

Q & A with Adam Walton

Posted in Uncategorized by aawalt88 on March 1, 2011

I sat down with my dad, Adam Walton, to discuss his thoughts on farming. I asked him some questions about becoming a farmer and the challenges faced by young farmers.

Adam Walton

Q. Where do young farmers start or how can they start?

A. I think there is no way to start farming without a lot of help. The sheer cost of land and equipment makes it imposible to get a loan with no credit or equity.

Q. What impact do family members have on  the farm business?

A. It’s a balancing act because you try to keep business as business and family as family and not bring it home with you.

Q. How are young farmers able to afford a farm, equipment, house, sheds, storage bins?

A. It will take time, hopfully they can use their family’s equipment, storage, and rent land and maybe buy a house or rent it.

Q. If you are a farmer what did you have to do to get started farming?

A. My parents gave us a farm (176 acres) and we were able to get loans to operate and buy cheap equipment that we fixed a lot. We rented land and bought more land by barrowing against the 176 acres.

Q. What advice do you have for young farmers?

A. Be nice to their parents, he jokes. Don’t get in a hurry, it will happen. The older generation will pass to the younger generation but  not right away, only when they can afford to. When you hurry,  you can also do a bad job of farming or have accident.

Q. Where do you see the future of farming in general?

A. It should stay good as long as input prices stay stable and land is available to rent or buy.

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